Home | ChronologyNews | Links | Weather | Jordan Facts | Photo Gallery | Contact Us


Roman Forts on the 
Arabian Frontier Menu

Virtual Karak Resources Project - VKRP
Virtual Karak Resources Project - VKRP
Virtual Karak Resources Project - VKRP
Virtual Karak Resources Project - VKRP
Virtual Karak Resources Project - VKRP
Virtual Karak Resources Project - VKRP
Virtual Karak Resources Project - VKRP
Virtual Karak Resources Project - VKRP

Gregory Linton
Professor of New Testament
Great Lakes Christian College

The End of the Roman Frontier in Arabia

The Roman military presence in Arabia began to decline in the mid-400s when forces were diverted to other threatened frontiers. In the early 500s, Justinian turned over the defense of the southeastern frontier to the Ghassanids, a Christian Arab tribe. Around AD 530, the troops were withdrawn and the limes Arabicus ceased to exist. The forts of el-Lejjun, Khirbet el-Fityan, Rujm Beni Yasser, Qasr Bshir, and Da'janiya were abandoned at this time. The numerous watchtowers provide no evidence of occupation in the sixth or early seventh centuries. At least by the early 600s, the fortified frontier system in Palestine and Transjordan no longer existed. This withdrawal of defenses paved the way for the eventual Muslim conquest of the region in the 600s.

 

Copyright 2001-2014 Virtual Karak Resources Project and Appalachian College Association
This web site is for educational use.  All photos are used by permission of its respective photographer.
This web site is best viewed with Internet Explorer 6.0 or greater using 800 X 600 resolution.
Site Designed by NTucker.com